Highland Malts

 

 

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NAME
Age/
Strength

 

25ml.
Bottle
 
Dist.Date
Alc. Vol.
Bottler
Price
Price

* means Price is for 50ml miniature bottle

Includes the distilleries north of the Highland Line which very roughly bisects Scotland from Greenock
in the west to Dundee in the east [Speyside distilleries though grouped separately are Highland]. It is historically considered that “the best malt whisky was and still is made in the Highlands of Scotland”
[Sir Robert Bruce Lockhart: Scotch] - they are generally sweet, peaty and full-bodied.

ABERFELDY: Aberfeldy, Perthshire. [Central]
Comment: built by “Whisky Tom” Dewar [it was he who made the very 1st commercial - “Make it a Dewar’s” - in the USA] in idyllic surroundings on the River Tay’s bonnie banks near woodlands where our native, red squirrel thrives, and, though now owned by United Distillers plc, it is still Dewar’s signature malt.
Notes: est.1896; water - hard, from the Pitilie Burn. Best: after a satisfying dinner.

ABERFELDY

12yo

40.0%
OB
4.50
 
ABERFELDY
14yo 1983
59.5%
Adel.
9.50
 

 

“smoky, spicy, stewed apple nose with a crowded, orange-box finish”

 

BALBLAIR: Edderton, Ross-shire. [Northern]
Comment: locally, the Edderton area is known as “the Parish of the Peats” and the air is said to be “the Purist in Scotland”. Because it was closed between 1847 and 1915 it has retained many period features and it remains a very picturesque example of a small, country distillery.
Notes: est.1790; water - The Allt Dearg, a peaty burn 4 miles from the distillery. Best: before dinner here.

BALBLAIR A Creation of the Elements
40.0%
OB
4.50
 

“light and fresh with a hint of the autumn mist, sweet at the start with an
appetising citric twist and a slightly peaty note, but quite a light, short finish"

BALBLAIR
16yo
OB
40.0%
5.25
 

“medium to full-bodied with a toffee/aniseed character, a rounder, smoother and longer finish"

BALBLAIR  Vintage 2003
10yo
46.0%
OB
5.50
 
BALBLAIR  Bourbon Cask
26yo 1979
46.0%
OB
9.50
 
BALBLAIR  Limited Edition
31yo 1969
45.0%
OB
10.25
 
BALBLAIR
10yo
40.0%
G&M
4.50
 

 

“a sweet raspberry/aniseed fragrance”

 

 

BEN NEVIS: Lochy Bridge, Fort William. [Western]
Comment: founded by “Long John” MacDonald who on 14th June, 1827 acknowledged that whisky’s manufacture was “no miracle other than that which is worked when science and nature combine”.

BEN NEVIS
10yo
46.0%
OB
4.50
 
BEN WYVIS The Final Resurrection
27yo 1972
43.0%
OB
 
1080
BLAIR ATHOL Flora & Fauna
12yo
43.0%
OB
4.50
 
BLAIR ATHOL Bicentenary
18yo
56.7%
OB
 
240

 

BRECHIN [NORTH PORT]: Brechin, Angus. [Eastern]
Comment: its name was taken from the north gate in the once-walled Brechin. Barnard recorded that “the district around Brechin being highly cultivated, barley of the highest quality is grown and carted” to the distillery, “where nothing but the best barley is malted.”
Notes: est.1820, closed 1983 [& now demolished]; water - Loch Lee [by pipeline]. Best: as an aperitif.

BRECHIN[NORTH PORT]
24yo 1976
60.4%
Adel.
11.75
 

“light, sweetish, smoky nose, smooth, heather honey but becoming dryer in the finish”

BRORA  Rare Malts
24yo 1977
56.1%
OB
36.50
 
BRORA  Connoisseurs Choice
1982
43.0%
G&M
9.75
 

“could this be Islay? - tar, iodine, seaweed and salt though maybe more delicate
but still dry, peppery and very reminiscent of the West Coast islands”

CLYNELISH: Brora, Sutherland [Northern]
Comment: pronounces “clin-LEASH”, this “island” character distillery is a successor to Brora/Clynelish, which was originally built because the Marquis of Stafford, later the notorious 1st Duke of Sutherland, wished to create a market for his coastal barley, this was during the time of the infamous Highland Clearances [in 1819 in just one night, 250 crofts were burned] to allow his Cheviot sheep to graze freely. As a whisky though it has always been very highly regarded - the renowned Victorian connoisseur, Professor George Saintsbury [notes on a Cellar Book], declared it his favourite and thought that blended with The Glenlivet it was a sublime dram.
Notes: est.1967 [Brora est.1819]; water - The Clynemilton Burn. Best: with a Portmahomack lobster.

CLYNELISH
14yo
46.0%
OB
5.25
 

“almost a tropical beach nose; luscious sweet fruit and smoky peat palate - barbecue
on that beach, though definitely a Highland malt”

 CLYNELISH  Rare Malts
23yo 1974
59.1%
OB
12.25
 

“full-bodied, with a fresh sea breeze blowing gently through a sweet oak”

CLYNELISH  Manager’s Dram
17yo
61.8%
OB
32.50
 
CLYNELISH  Connoisseurs Choice
1990
40.0%
G&M
5.50
 
CLYNELISH  Cask
12yo
57.9%
G&M
6.50
 
CLYNELISH
8yo 1989
62.1%
Adel.
8.00
 

“a rich Russian caramel, flowery and fennel nose and then like swallowing a
foamy sea-spray with just a modicum of mustard”

THE DALMORE: Alness, Ross-shire. [Northern]
Comment: this “meadowland” distillery is beautifully situated overlooking the Cromarty Firth and the fertile Black Isle and signals a more relaxed bygone age - its offices are very finely oak-panelled.
Notes: est. 1839; water - the River Alness flowing from Loch Marie. Best: after a leisurely dinner.

THE DALMORE
12yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 

“bubbling Dundee marmalade spread on brown toast”

THE DALMORE  Cigar Malt

43.0%

OB

4.50

 
THE DALMORE  Dee Dram

 

40.0%
OB
4.75
THE DALMORE  Black Isle
12yo
40.0%
OB
6.25
 
THE DALMORE
21yo
43.0%
OB
9.50
 
THE DALMORE  Matusalem Sherry
30yo 1973
42.0%
OB
11.75
 
THE DALMORE  Stillman’s Dram
30yo
45.0%
OB
13.25
 

DALWHINNIE: Dalwhinnie, Inverness-shire. [Central]
Comment: pronounced “dull-WHINNY”, it means “meeting place” for it was where the cattle from the North and West converged on their Lowland drives; and on the whisky smuggling routes; and where General Wade’s military road divided and also the scene of many clan battles against the “auld enemy”. It was Scotland’s highest distillery [1,073 feet above sea-level] and is still an official meteorological station.
Notes: est. 1897; water - Allt an t’Sluie Burn, The Lochan an Doire-Uaine. Best: as an aperitif.

DALWHINNIE
15yo
43.0%
OB
5.25
 
DEANSTON
12yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 

THE EDRADOUR: Balnaud, Pitlochry, Perthshire. [Central]
Comment: pronounced “edra-dower”, this picturesque distillery is Scotland’s smallest. Some of its almost hand-crafted output is the “top dressing” for the celebrated “House of Lords” and “King’s Ransom” blends [these were supplied in specially shaped strong bottles to bootleggers during the U.S.A.‘s misguided “Prohibition Era”]. It is aged exclusively in ex-Oloroso sherry casks.
Notes: est. 1825; water - a Ben Vrackie peaty granite spring [it is a very widely held belief throughout the Highlands that the best whisky is made from water which comes off granite through peat]. Best: after dinner.

THE EDRADOUR  Distillery Edition

10yo

40.0%

OB

5.50

 

“very sweet - roasting chestnuts with marzipan and mint overtones; big, malty, smooth and rich buttery finish"

THE EDRADOUR  Ballechin Madeira
 
46.0%
OB
8.25
 

FETTERCAIRN: Fettercairn, Laurencekirk, Kincardineshire. [Eastern]

Comment:the whisky from this distillery matures early. In 1829 Prime Minister Gladstone's family acquired the neighbouring Fasque estate and he subsequently helped and encouraged the whisky trade - especially in 1853 by abolishing the quite iniquitous Malt Tax. Formerly used in "Johnnie Walker" but is now in the "White & Mackay" blends.

 

FETTERCAIRN Fasque
 
42.0%
OB
4.50
 
FETTERCAIRN  Connoisseurs Choice
1992

46.0%

G&M

4.75
 

 

 
 
 

 

 
GLENCADAM  Connoisseurs Choice
1987
40.0%
G&M
5.50
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GLENESK Connoisseurs Choice
1985
40.0%
G&M
5.50
 

 

 

GLEN GARIOCH: Old Meldrum, Aberdeenshire. [Eastern]
Comment: pronounced “glen geerie” it is situated in the Valley of the Garioch - often called “The Granary of Aberdeenshire”. Some doubts surround its establishment date as it appears its first spirit may have been reported on 1st December, 1785 in The Aberdeen Journal - somewhat before its claimed date.
Notes: est. 1797?; water - Percock Hill springs, peat - Pitsligo Moss. Best: with haggis

GLENGARIOCH
15yo
43.0%
OB
5.25
 


“from malty, syrupy notes through heather to a perfumery, smoky character”

 

GLENGOYNE: Dumgoyne, near Killearn, Stirlingshire. [Southern]
Comment: steeped in “Rob Roy” lore and though above the Highland Line is regarded as a Lowland malt for fillings and blending purposes as it is not peated and mainly matured in plain oak casks.
Notes: est. 1833; water - The Distillery Burn on Dumgoyne Hill. Best: anytime
.

GLENGOYNE
10yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 
GLENLOCHY Rare Old
1965
40.0%
G&M
13.25
 

GLEMORANGIE: Tain, Ross-shire [Northern]
Comment: pronounced “glen-MORRengy”, this smallish, local [telephone 01862 892477 to book a guided tour] distillery, nestled in its “glen of tranquillity” produces the most popular malt in Scotland [all its creation is sold as single malt]. Its copper swan-necked stills [ex-London gin stills] are the tallest “whisky stills” in Scotland. It is matured, except for special “finishes” [i.e. Madeira, Port & Sherry etc. - during which the whisky spends a final period of ageing, after its 10 years in the oak barrels, in the respective casks which allows it to develop further intriguing characteristics] in ex-Bourbon white oak casks from The Ozark Mountains in Missouri and then depending on age maybe transferred to “new oak”.
Notes: est. 1843; water - very hard and mineral-rich from Tarlogie Hills’ lime and sandstone springs, peat from Pitsligo, Aberdeenshire. Best: here & now!

GLENMORANGIE
10yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 
                               Special Reserve
43.0%
OB
5.00
 
                               Warehouse 3 Reserve
40.0%
OB
5.25
 
15yo
43.0%
OB
5.50
 
                               Burgundy Wood
43.0%
OB
5.50
 
                               Sherry Wood
43.0%
OB
5.50
 
                               Cellar 13
10yo
43.0%
OB
5.75
 
                               Quinta Ruban Port Cask
 
46.0%
OB
6.00
 
                               Golden Rum
12yo
40.0%
OB
6.25

 

                               Three Cask
12yo
40.0%
OB
6.50
 
                               Fino Sherry Wood
 
43.0%
OB
6.75
 

“delicate whiff of mincemeat-stuffed, baked cooking apples”

GLENMORANGIE
18yo
43.0%
OB
6.75
 
                                 Artisan Cask
1995
46.0%
OB
7.00
 
                                 The Native Ross-shire
10yo 1981
59.2%
OB
7.75
 

                                 Traditional

 
57.2%
OB
8.00
 
                                 Speakeasy
13yo 1991
58.4%%
OB
8.25
 
                                 Port Wood
 
43.0%
OB
 
9.75*

“rich with a heady vanilla, lemon balm, butterscotch and tablet nose, smooth
yet spicy, with a long-lingering dark chocolate finish"

GLENMORANGIE
1974
43.0%
OB
10.00
 
 
1975
43.0%
OB
10.00
 
 
1977
43.0%
OB
10.25
 
 
1971
43.0%
OB
13.25
 
                                Malaga Wood
25yo
43.0%
OB
13.25
 

“the full excitement of warm Christmas pudding with an Atholl Brose cream - rich,
sweet and spicy with chocolate orange, mint and coffee notes. Braw!”

                               Côte de Beaune Wood
12yo
46.0%
OB
13.75
 

“as enticing as a newly opened box of dark, mixed, rich chocolates chewy, tingling
spices with dark fruit, chocolate, mint, wine and nuts. Brilliant!”

                               Millennium
12yo
40.0%
OB
 
190
                               White Rum Wood
18yo
46.0%
OB
23.00
 
                               Claret Wood
 
43.0%
OB
 
375
                               Missouri Oak Reserve
1991
55.75%
OB
 
565
                               Sauternes Wood
1981
46.0%
OB
26.00
 
                               Côte de Nuits Wood
25yo 1975
43.0%
OB
32.50
 
                               Oloroso Cask Finish
30yo
44.3%
OB
 
810

 

GLEN ORD: Muir of Ord, Ross-shire. [Northern]
Comment: The New Statistical Account of Scotland recorded in 1840 that the “distilling of aquavit” was the sole industry of this Black Isle area. Much of the production is blended [Dewar’s], but it was awarded the International Wines & Spirits Competition Trophy for the “best single malt up to 15 years”.
Notes:est. 1838; water - Allt Fionnaidh from Lochs nan Eun and nam Bonnach [“The Heaven and Hell of the White Burn”] in The Knockudas Hills. Best: after eating.

GLEN ORD
12yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 

“a delicate balance of barley-sugar sweetness and malty dryness”

GLEN ORD
12yo
43.0%
OB
5.00
 
                      Rare Malts
23yo 1973
59.8%
OB
 
465.00

GLENTURRET: The Hosh, Crieff, Perthshire. [Central]
Comment: claims to be the oldest distillery [distilling was recorded from 1717], it is certainly the most venerable in the Highlands and one of the smallest. Glenturret’s rodent operative, Towser [21/4/1963-20/3/1987], caught a world record 28,899 mice.
Notes: est. 1775; water - Loch Turret. Best: after dinner.

GLENTURRET
15yo
40.0%
OB
6.25
 

“full and profound - sweet, peppery with citric, liquorice and mint notes”

GLENUGIE Rare Old
1968
40.0%
G&M
13.25
 
GLENURY ROYAL Rare Malts
29yo 1970
57.0%
OB
13.25
 
INCHMURRIN
10yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 
LOCH LOMOND
40.0%
OB
4.50
 
LOCHSIDE Connoisseurs Choice
1991
43.0%
G&M
5.25
 

OBAN: Stafford Street, Oban, Argyllshire. [West Coast]
Comment: founded by the Stevenson family, whose many and various activities helped Oban grow from a wee fishing village into the bustling gateway to the Isles, but, who, at times, regretfully neglected their distillery.
Notes: est. 1794; water - Lochs Gleann and Bhearraidh in Ardconnel. Best: with a meal.

OBAN
14yo
43.0%
OB
5.00
 
           Manager’s Dram
16yo
64.0%
OB
57.50
 

“creamy, nutty-malt with spicy oak shavings”

OLD PULTENEY: Wick, Caithness. [Northern]
Comment: the most northerly distillery on the mainland and known as “the Manzanilla of the North”
Notes: est.1826; water - The Loch of Hempriggs. Best: before a seafood dinner.

OLD PULTENEY
12yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 

“very dry, sandy and seaweedy with bitter chocolate and nut oil notes”

OLD RHOSDHU
5yo
40.0%
OB
4.00
 
ROYAL LOCHNAGAR
12yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 
                                      Selected Reserve
43.0%
OB
32.50
 

 

TEANINICH: Alness, Ross-shire. [Northern]
Comment: pronounced “tea-an-inich”, this large distillery is on the River Alness at the Cromarty Firth so tourists [by appointment only], dolphins and porpoises are welcomed. When Barnard visited he marvelled that “it is the only distillery north of Inverness that is lighted by electricity; besides which it possesses telephonic communication with the Proprietor’s residence and the quarters of the Excise Officers!” It is one of the features of Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Liqueur [“Drambuie”].
Notes: est.1817; water - Averon River, The Dairywell Spring. Best: after luncheon.

TEANINICH Flora & Fauna
10yo
43.0%
OB
5.00
 
                      Rare Malts
23yo 1972
64.95%
OB
13.25
 

“like wandering in the woods”

TEANINICH  Rare Malts
27yo 1972
64.2%
OB
13.25
 
                      Manager’s  Dram 2001
17yo
58.3%
OB
 
210.00
                      Connoisseurs Choice
1982
40.0%
G&M
5.25
 
                      Connoisseurs Choice
1976
40.0%
G&M
5.50
 
 
24yo 1973
56.6%
Adel.
13.25
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TOMATIN
10yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 

TULLIBARDINE: Blackford, Perthshire. [Southern]
Comment: pronounced “tully-barn-eye-n”, it is built on the site of an ancient brewery. The soft Blackford water has always been renowned - its ale toasted James IV at his investiture in 1488 at Scone; Barnard reported its “fine character” in the 19th century; and today it sources “Highland Spring” and “Gleneagles” mineral waters.
Notes: re-est. 1949; water - The Danny Burn. Best: before eating.

TULLIBARDINE
10yo
40.0%
OB
4.50
 



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